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Jaden Ventura

Yosemite, which is famous for drawing international travelers, is celebrating its 125th anniversary as a national park.

Yosemite National Parks has a rich history spanning back over 15o years. President Lincoln passed the Yosemite Land Grant Act. This was the first time that land had been set aside in order to preserve Yosemite’s natural condition, and be available to the public. Both the California State Park System, and the ideology of a national park begun because of this historical legislation. 

The commemoration of Yosemite starts on Oct. 1, and continues throughout the month. This month is the celebration of the 125th anniversary of Yosemite as a national park. The anniversary will include The Lure and Lore of Yosemite Exhibit.

The anniversary began on the start of October and will continue throughout the month. The park along with its partners held events throughout the day including a public ceremony that held special speakers, dignitarie and a memorial. The Lure and Lore Exhibit will be open all throughout the month free for public viewing.

Mother of FC student (Suky Cheema), Harkirat Cheema talks about her first experience going to Yosemite. Her perspective on Yosemite portrayed beauty, and amazing scenery.

“My greatest experience at Yosemite is that when you go there and you park and you just look up, it’s beautiful,” Cheema said. “That’s one of the reasons why my family and I wanted to go to Yosemite. So we went up and we absolutely enjoyed it. The scenery is amazing over there. I think what my family and I thought was unique about Yosemite, was that when we got up there, it was just trees, and trees, and mountains. What really stood out from the amazing scenery were the mountains. The were shaped so beautifully and I could really tell God really spent his time making this. Truly a work of God himself.”

This year we celebrate 125 years of Yosemite as a national park. Yet prior to that in 1864, Yosemite valley and the Mariposa Grove and giant sequoias were set aside by President Abraham Lincoln. Thanks to Lincoln, Yosemite is an incredibly beautiful place, and I think for a lot of  people its creates a sense of inspiration and sense of being. It’s something much larger than ourselves, and it’s a very powerful experience to come an see Yosemite National Park. — Ashley Mayer, Director of Communications

The Lure and Lore of Yosemite Exhibit portrays various historical items from the late 1800’s ranging from books, and maps, to artwork, and historical documents. Works from John Muir, Lafayette Houghton Bunnell, James Mason Hutchings, and many more contributors, are on display for public viewing. The exhibit is located in the visitor center of the Yosemite Sierra Visitors Bureau in Oakhurst. The exhibit is free for public viewing during visitor center operating hours.

Yosemite Gateway Partners are composed of organizations, citizens, and communities. Most of these groups cooperate with each other to develop a long lasting environmental cultural, natural, and economic growth. Some partners like NatureBridge is dedicated to providing educational adventures in nature’s classroom to inspire a personal connection to the natural world, and responsible actions to sustain it.

Director of Communications at Yosemite’s public affairs office, Ashley Mayer, talks about the brief history of Yosemite. Her view of the national park provides insight on the beauty of Yosemite.

“A lot of people don’t realize that Yosemite was also the start of the California State Park System,” Mayer said. “This year we celebrate 125 years of Yosemite as a national park. Yet prior to that in 1864, Yosemite valley and the Mariposa grove and giant Sequoias were set aside by President Abraham Lincoln. Thanks to Lincoln, Yosemite is an incredibly beautiful place, and I think for a lot of  people its creates a sense of inspiration and sense of being. It’s something much larger than ourselves, and it’s a very powerful experience to come an see Yosemite National Park.”

IMG_0506Jaden Ventura

The state park has thrived on the contributions from local donors and visitors.

Cheema provides her families experience going to Yosemite together. She expresses her expectations through the view that she shared with her family.

“It was 2 years ago when some of our family came from Stockton and they had never seen Yosemite,” Cheema said. “Well the reason why we went was because some of our family had never gone and we had before but that was when my son Suky was really little. So we took our whole family and it was a blast. The kids loved it and they were amazed at how beautiful Yosemite looked. I went with my whole family. It was a great ride there and back. We were all pretty excited because some of us had only seen pictures of Yosemite but now we were actually going there and witnessing it with our own eyes”

The support of donors, has helped Yosemite become what it is today. The Yosemite Conservancy provides Yosemite to help protect and preserve the national park for many generations to come. The funds are put to use in various ways throughout the park to keep is aesthetically pleasing. Everywhere from trail rehabilitation to wildlife and habitat preservation.

The Conservancy is dedicated to enhancing the visitor experience and providing a deeper connection to the park through outdoor programs, volunteering and wilderness services. Over 39,000 supporters have provided over $10 million annually to support Yosemite. These supporters, and donors are what has kept the national park in tact for over 100 years, and have made Yosemite’s 125 anniversary possible.

To help preserve Yosemite and protect its natural wildlife, you can donate at yosemiteconservancy.org. By supporting Yosemite Conservancy you are helping to preserve and protect the wildlife and beauty of Yosemite for generations to come. Your donation is an investment in Yosemite’s future. With your funding Yosemite can better protect this national park.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_jadenventura03 and via email: Jaden Ventura.

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