Color guard team prepares for competition season

Color guard team prepares for competition season

Campus team gears up for competition

Feather Staff | The Feather Online

Color guard members practice their routines for upcoming competitions.

The color guard program was introduced to the school in 2007 and has grown since its inception. Under the leadership of Alicia Gonzalez and Michelle Rodriguez, the team awaits a full season of competition and new routines.

Returning color guard participant, Brennen Tozlian, ‘21,  shares his experiences on the team and what excites him about the upcoming season.

“I always watched the people who waved the huge flags at football games,” Tozlian said. “I thought it might be cool to try that out. I joined color guard in eighth grade because I had a friend in it who said it would be fun so I decided to try it out. My favorite part of color guard is competing because it gives you a rush when you’re out there performing in front of everyone.”

A lot of practicing and effort goes into each routine that the group presents. Tozlian expresses his excitement about the new year and entering into a leadership role.

“This year I am excited to perform routines because we have seven people on the team instead of five. I’m nervous for the new students that are joining because we as students are mainly responsible for teaching them techniques. It is a big responsibility and I’m still in the process of learning my part. But I think we will be able to do some different routines this year and have a great season!”

During winter guard season, the color guard team participates in four competitions, each one building on the last. In 2016, the team placed fourth overall in their competitions, beating Fresno High School, Sunnyside High School, Roosevelt High School and McLane High School.

“I joined the team in seventh grade,” Howard said. “I was expecting it to be like the military guards who do formations and routines with rifles. Once I joined, I realized that it was similar, but we focus more on creative routines. Before we start off the season we participate in a few parades like the Veteran’s Day Parade and the Clovis Electric Lights Parade. The Clovis Electric Lights Parade is in the dark, so we get to put lights on our equipment, which is so much fun. Our competition season begins in January where we participate in the winter guard meets.

“I am excited for this upcoming season of winter guard,” Howard continued. “We have some new choreography for the fall parades and we are learning the details of competition season. I am hoping to score high this year and possibly place in the top few teams.”

This year, we are adding more dances to our routines. We are taking time to get the kids ready to be performers. I started color guard my sophomore year of high school and I am excited to pass on my knowledge to the kids. I am already seeing them progress from last year, and more than anything I want them to grow in their abilities. — Michelle Rodriguez, color guard coach

During winter guard season, the color guard team participates in four competitions, each one building on the last. In 2016, the team placed fourth overall in their competitions, beating Fresno High School, Sunnyside High School, Roosevelt High School and McLane High School.

“I became interested in color guard when I was little,” Bryant said. “My family and I would go to rodeos and I would see people waving flags around and I thought that was so cool. I would go home and practice with whatever I had. I am really excited to finally be able to join a color guard team. This year I am one of two middle schoolers in the group. It’s cool to be able to represent the junior high through color guard.”

Bryant shares her excitement about practices and the competitive season ahead.

“I am most looking forward to learning routines,” Bryant continued. “During practice, we learn routines for football games. We are being informed about competitions and all the cool stuff that color guard gets to be a part of.  I am most excited about winter guard season when we can compete with other schools.”

Feather Staff | The Feather Online

The group’s first performance is at Hoover High School, Jan. 12, where they will be revealing their song choice.

Campus color guard coach and California State University Fresno color guard team member Michelle Rodriguez shares her ambitions as the team prepares for winter guard season.

“This year, we are adding more dances to our routines,” Rodriguez said. “We are taking time to get the kids ready to be performers. I started color guard my sophomore year of high school and I am excited to pass on my knowledge to the kids. I am already seeing them progress from last year, and more than anything I want them to grow in their abilities.”

The group’s first performance is at Hoover High School, Jan. 12, where they will be revealing their song choice. Depending on the judges’ opinions, the team will increase the difficulty of their choreography or add more steps.

The color guard team performs at Fresno Christian home football games. They anxiously await the fall and winter season where they get the opportunity to showcase their talents in the Veterans Day Parade and the Clovis Electric Lights Parade.

For more information on color guard, read Color guard anticipates winter season. For more articles, read Kyle Dodson lives drama passion.

This author can be reached via Twitter @SchultzAddison and via email: Addison Schultz.

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By | 2017-10-10T14:39:35+00:00 October 10th, 2017|Features, Home Feature 1|0 Comments

About the Author:

Addison Schultz
For the past 10 years, freshman Addison Schultz built up an art inventory and started selling her work online. Her watercolor pieces soon became recognized by a friend, who offered to sell her work in her shop in California. Participation in junior high art class sparked a passion that traveled far beyond the classroom. Schultz partners with Kia Cotton, an art business owner, and they take time to teach youth at local events and birthday parties. She intends to pursue her trade into college, and the rest of her life. By her senior year of high school, Schultz aspires to sell her inventory in three shops, and own her own business someday. Looking forward to the upcoming year, Schultz is excited about the contributions she plans to make to the Feather.

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