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ASB president encourages student body to risk, try new activities

Julia Fikse | The Feather Online

Student body president Roman Endicott, ’18, encourages students to step outside of their comfort zone starting with ice skating, Jan. 27.

Senior and student body president Roman Endicott contributes a monthly column as part of his leadership commitment to his peers.

Welcome to the second semester! The holidays have left along with Christmas break and for some of us, our motivation to come back to school. Luckily, I have a great tip that may help get back into the swing of things.

I feel that taking a step out of our comfort zones would be a great way to start off the year as it would provide an array of advantages. I do want to stress, however, that there is a major difference in stepping out of your comfort zone and succumbing to peer pressure, but I will get into that next month.

Let me start off with an example. Say you want to take a step out and attend the “ice skating night” event next Saturday, Jan. 27. If this is something you would not normally do, there are a couple of things you need to ensure first.

Before doing anything of this sort, we must allow ourselves to have fun. If we go into something believing it will be a boring waste of time, it will most likely turn out that way. Be optimistic and shape the experience the way you want it to be.

Second, it always helps to bring a friend or find someone else who is going if you have a case of the social awkwardness, just like me. If that doesn’t work out, challenge yourself to make a new friend along the way.

Anytime we step out of our comfort zones, we are taking a risk. Whether it be trying a sport we’ve never played before, attempting to learn a new instrument or making the first move in any social situation, there is always room for failure. We should not let our own self doubts get in the way, though. — Roman Endicott

If you don’t have anyone to hang out with at ice skating, come find me and I will help you look like an Olympic skater with my awful coordination on skates. Anyone who was at senior retreat will remember how many times I fell during roller skating.

Now that we are ready, we can reap the benefits of this enlightening experience. Not only will the new and unfamiliar stimuli engage those dusty parts of our brains, but there is a great opportunity to bond with those around us either for the first time or on a deeper level.

Anytime we step out of our comfort zones, we are taking a risk. Whether it be trying a sport we’ve never played before, attempting to learn a new instrument or making the first move in any social situation, there is always room for failure. We should not let our own self doubts get in the way, though.

These types of attempts can lead to one of two outcomes. After stepping out of a comfort zone, one can be glad they did because it was a fun and exciting experience. The other outcome is they are glad they did because, although they might not have enjoyed themselves, they can say they tried and are armed with the knowledge that they can confidently devote their time elsewhere without the fear of missing out.

Kaylie Clem | The Feather Online

Endicott knows there are risks involved with stepping out of your comfort zone, but believes it can help you live out your potential.

Personally, I have experienced both. This past summer I stepped out and volunteered with Peoples Church in the children’s’ ministry as a leader during “Summer Splash.” I normally don’t spend much time with little kids and the thought of it made me shudder at the time. That experience helped me with being around children and led to some other connections which have continued to benefit m

I have also embarrassed myself trying something new. In 7th grade, I tried soccer for the first time in a while because I heard they needed a goalie. Little did I know how many goals I would give up that season which helped our team lose pretty much every game. Luckily, in 8th grade, I learned from my experiences and played basketball instead, which I enjoyed exponentially more.

Overall, I can not guarantee you will enjoy every new thing you try, but I will say that it will benefit you no matter what as long as peer pressure did not tip the scales of the final decision.

So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God. I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand. Isaiah 41:10

For more of Endicott’s columns, read COLUMN: Roman Endicott discusses life choices. For more articles, check out EDITORIAL: How helpful is the flu vaccine? 

Roman Endicott can be reached via email.

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