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Book Review: Unfiltered: No Shame, No Regrets, Just Me.

Danielle Foster | The Feather Online

Unfiltered: No Shame, No Regrets, Just Me is actress Lily Collins’ debut memoir in which she shares the stories of her life growing up and opens up and shares life struggles.

Unfiltered: No Shame, No Regrets, Just Me. is actress Lily Collins‘ debut memoir in which she shares the stories of her eating disorders, self-esteem issues, growing up in the spotlight and unhealthy relationships. This book allowed Collins to open up about her already public life in an even more candid way.

The book rotates around the four themes mentioned earlier throughout the 18 chapters. Collins opens up very honestly about her past eating disorders. Her once very healthy association with food somehow fell apart when she was sixteen.

She became obsessive over her fitness schedule and kept a close eye on how much food she was “allowed” to consume. This led to her fight with anorexia and later bulimia. Collins explains the trauma that came from it and regrets how long she lied to her mother about her struggles.

While she has since worked on resolving the issue, healing is a long ongoing process. She learned to view “Food as Fuel, not Punishment” as she titles one of her chapters and discusses how she, at the time of the books publishment, had wrapped a movie called To the Bone, where she portrays a girl with an eating disorder, and how it tied into her own personal struggle.

Besides just discussing eating disorders, she talks about self-esteem in general. Unfiltered starts with a chapter where she explains one of her earliest insecurities and how she felt during that time. But when she reflects on that, she realizes now that those quirky things that made her unique should be embraced.

Collins believes starting acting at a young age taught her a lot about rejection. The spotlight at such a young age put a lot of pressure on her, but also opened up many opportunities outside of acting. She wrote a piece called “LA Confidential” for Elle Girl UK. Because of that job, she was offered many press opportunities, enabling her to interview stars on the red carpet and cover large events, including Barack Obama’s 2009 inauguration.

Based on her own life, this book gave an insight to Collins personally, but also shined a light on many struggles and questions other teenage girls hold. I appreciated that because typically, celebrities are not so eager to open up about. It is written almost as if she is speaking to a live audience, which makes it very simple to read and follow. — Toryn Triplitt

Collins also shares a large amount from her personal dating life. She had been in relationships with men who did not value her, wasted her time and some even dealt with addiction. When the lightbulb moments happened like verbal and substance abuse occurred, she realized she deserved more. 

Finally, she dives deep into her family dynamics. Collins dedicates a chapter specifically to both her mother and father. While she grew up very close with her mother, Collins discusses how not having her dad around often growing up hurt their relationship and his drinking caused a constant concern. 

This book is well written in the way she conveys her struggles and encourages the readers. The book kept me entertained because it was very relatable, and she offered plenty of practical advice to the readers.

Based on her own life, this book gave an insight to Collins personally, but also shined a light on many struggles and questions other teenage girls hold. I appreciated that because typically, celebrities are not so eager to open up about. It is written almost as if she is speaking to a live audience, which makes it very simple to read and follow.

One thing I wish had been done differently is her explanations of how high school was a struggle for her. In that, it would have been interesting for her to share more about her education. She shares she did not complete college, but does not touch much on her experience there either.

In one of my past articles, COLUMN: Toryn Triplitt talks body image, I touch on some of my own struggles with body image. This book was even more enjoyable because of how relatable it was. Her advice was topics that I can really take to heart and appreciate.

I enjoyed the quick read and the ups and downs of her life through the chapters. Collin’s offers good advice and this book is perfect for someone who struggles with identity. I recommend this read to all teenage girls for what it contains inside.

For more book reviews, read Book Review: Once an Arafat Man and Book review: Almost Midnight

This author can be reached via twitter @toryntriplitt and via email: Toryn Triplitt.

Unfiltered: No Shame, No Regrets, Just Me.
4 / 5 Reviewer
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