Students share their successes, struggles in obtaining drivers licenses

Students share their successes, struggles in obtaining drivers licenses

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Driving offers opportunities, mobility

A drive to the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). Questions appear on the screen and a passing score is achieved. Their picture is taken, and a permit is presented to the student driver.

Sam Cross | The Feather Online

Top reasons student drivers fail their drivers test according to DMV.ca.gov web site.

FC students who are 15 and a half up are becoming prepared for the journey to their California drivers license from the DMV.

Failing the first time to receive his permit, sophomore Carson Ochs sought to pass the test on his second attempt. Ochs recently received his permit, and now gets to practice at least once a day driving his parents around town for any errands.

“The reason I wanted to get my permit was so can get my license,” Ochs said. “Then I can have freedom to go anywhere I want. I don’t have to wait on my parents to take me places I can just go myself.”

CarInsurance.com reports that only 56% of respondents could pass the driving test. Women did better than men and older drivers also outscored their younger counterparts.

Junior Deborah Ingerson received her drivers license last year in June, making the most of it by driving everyday. She believes high school students are responsible enough to drive on campus, and it’s freedom to be allowed too.

“I always wanted to drive,” Ingerson said. “It’s been a thing I wanted to do. So once I turned 16, I went for my license. High schoolers should be able to drive on campus and handle the responsibility for their actions.”

Testing for her license test next week, Rosanelli Barrios, ‘20, began driving in August when she received her driver’s permit. Preparing everyday for the test by going out and driving with her parents, Barrios says students should get their license.

“Yes, I think it’s important for high school students to drive,” Barrios said. “I don’t think our parents want to be our Uber all the time. I think it’s a good responsibility for high school students to have too.”

Riley Goldsborough, ‘21, revived his drivers permit a few months ago, not with much practice yet he hopes to grow his driving skill with an instructor soon.

“I think it’s important for a high school student to drive,” Goldsborough said. “Learning to drive in high school will definitely help you when your super busy in college and you already have the driving part out of the way. It really helps take stress off of parents to do different stuff they can just ask their kids to do it.”

 

New or established drivers can learn more about California driving laws, get news updates, media resources, statistics and related DMV programs by visiting the Statewide News Releases section of the DMV.ca.gov web site.

Whether driving in Fresno, California, across the United States or in different countries, be sure to check the local, state or country driving laws. The following tweet is from @RSAIreland on road safety.

The Ireland road safety authority shares information on proper headlight usage.

Before teens can take the written test, they first have to complete the online course, learning all of the rules and laws of operating a motor vehicle. The online course also has an online exam testing what they have learned. Once students pass that test, then they can finally take the actual permit test at the California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV).

Without a permit or license, junior Angel Ruelas hopes to receive his permit soon. Preoccupied with school, soccer, and preparing for the SAT, he was unable to find time to do things for himself.

“Well, it really depends on the family,” Ruelas said. “If the parents aren’t able to give their child a ride, then yea, I think it’s important. But if the family is able to give their child a ride to the places they need then I don’t think they really need it.”

Out of 206 students 177 students participated in the following poll, asking whether they have a permit, license, or neither (Collected by Kyler Garza).

The written test itself is not as easy as it seems. According to the article, “Why Many Student Drivers Fail Their Written Permit Exam” 60 percent of the first time written drivers test takers failed the exam.

For more information on tips for passing the drivers exam, go to DMV.org. Some examples of what they provide are focus on young drivers, not the examiner. The focus is to not worry about the mistakes, and be comfortable with your vehicle.

Kyler Garza can be reached via email.

For more student driver articles, read New campus drivers and Underclassmen express fears, thrills of driving.

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By |2019-01-29T09:47:14+00:00January 29th, 2019|Features, Home Feature 1|0 Comments

About the Author:

Kyler Garza
“Life isn’t about finding yourself, life is about creating yourself,” -- George Bernard Shaw. Working full time as an accountant in summer at his parents farm labor contracting company, Kyler Garza, ’21, plans attending Fresno State, earning a degree in business accountancy. Garza commits his time after school entering payroll for five-six hours every week. He balances his interest in math by accompanying the church choir, playing piano. Since eight years old, Garza has learned to play classical music by note and ear. In his second year mentoring junior high students in Brother to Brother, he commits two hours every month during lunch. Garza participated in the Wreath Laying Ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, by winning an essay contest in eighth grade. Garza views his first year on The Feather as an opportunity to grow in his writing skills and build a stronger work ethic.

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