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Unity shines through compassion, words, volunteers

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Civilians are prompted to stay six feet away from one another to prevent spreading COVID-19, but those extra feet aren’t required to serve, reach out and volunteer in the community.

Over 6.6 million people have filed for unemployment in the U.S. High school seniors struggle to comprehend an existence where graduation is prohibited. The world attempts to recover from nearly 60,000 deaths caused by COVID-19. Yet many are beginning to put their own needs aside and look for ways to improve the lives of those who are vulnerable.

The virus has shifted the lifestyles of communities in 205 countries and humanity fights to come together at a time when unity is, in some cases, illegal.

Despite the anxiety clouding the minds of millions of high schoolers and job seekers, this time away from the workplace has communicated that often the best of people is revealed during the worst of times. As schools, careers and businesses have been forced to shut down, mankind’s outward thinking has swelled in response.

According to Good News Movement, a journalist-run social media page filled with stories of human altruism, Brooklyn, NY landlord Mario Salerno waved the rent for his 200 tenants to allow them to provide for their families. In Sugar Land, TX, a man continued to support his wife undergoing chemotherapy by sitting on the outskirts of the building with a sign of encouragement.

Medical frontline workers also receive community contributions as they occupy spaces most people are encouraged to avoid. From social media trends inspiring people to give a shoutout to medical personnel to the donation of handmade face masks, nurses and doctors embrace worldwide support as they risk their lives on a daily basis.

In the following tweet, Good News network shares some of their positive headlines to keep followers encouraged and uplifted.

Social media and online platforms play a vital role in the fellowship of human beings amid shelter-in-place mandates. Posts, stories, texts and video chats are the new high-fives, hugs and ‘hellos,’ as hospital workers, sick patients and those sheltering alone in their studio apartment strive to stay connected to and encourage family and friends.

The social media spread not only encourages service in people, but acts as a pipeline for inspiration. Creativity is often born out of boredom and new hobbies have been discovered by students and adults during the encouraged social distancing.

Clay Banks on Unsplash

Pandemics and world wars often convict humanity of its responsibility to care for the elderly, volunteer in the community or reach out to a friend.

Increased apathy during this time can be diminished by trying new activities such as reading a book, learning a new language, baking treats for neighbors, playing games, learning a TikTok dance or engaging in social media trends. Often shared on Instagram or Twitter, these new methods of entertainment keep the minds of individuals amused as they contemplate next steps.

Civilians are prompted to stay six feet away from one another to prevent spreading COVID-19, but those extra feet aren’t required to serve, reach out and volunteer in the community. Baking cookies for a neighbor, sending a card rather than a text or picking up an elderly neighbor’s groceries serve as practical ways to show an outward-focused mindset during the shelter-in-place.

Supporting the community and world through capital and material donations aid both coronavirus victims and medical personnel. Charity Navigator provides many avenues of support depending on the non-profit and GlobalGiving accepts monetary donations, all given to vulnerable groups susceptible to the coronavirus.

In the following Instagram post, The Well Community Church offers different ways to help vulnerable areas and serve during the shelter-in-place mandate.

 

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We are stepping out to support our community by collecting books, medical supplies, personal hygiene items, food and other donations of compassion to help resource the ministries working directly with the most vulnerable in our city during the current COVID-19 crisis.⁣ ⁣ Monday, Wednesday, and Friday of next week we invite you to drop-off your donations between 1pm and 6pm at The Well Fig Garden and The Well North Campuses.⁣ ⁣ While we continue to engage social distancing at our collection sites, our desire is to have the gospel faithfully proclaimed by our actions and provide opportunities in which the people of God can shine in this dark time.⁣ ⁣ Check the link in bio for a full list of donation needs.

A post shared by The Well Community Church (@wellchurch) on

Seen in events like World War II, the “home-front” of the world rallies together in times of crisis. However, it shouldn’t take pandemics or world wars to convict humanity of its responsibility to care for the elderly, volunteer in the community or reach out to a friend.

While social distancing is encouraged and beneficial for groups around the globe, the coronavirus presents students, families, workers and businesses with an opportunity to discover unique ways to connect with their communities. Though six feet apart physically, compassionate actions and words manifest the unification of mankind.

For another editorial, read EDITORIAL: Media literacy crucial to Generation Z’s response to global affairs.

For more articles, read Professionals, students share origins of political divide, solutions for change and A look inside California’s electrical grid.

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